Royal Panda roulette

Author Topic: Single Dozen Progression  (Read 1085 times)

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Sputnik

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Single Dozen Progression
« on: October 06, 2016, 10:14:53 AM »

Here is a progression i find ...

1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9 - Total bankroll = 90
For every loss move one step to the right and after ever win move 3 steps to the left

But is not so many steps or attempts - so i wounder if some one know any other single dozen progression that stretch things even further.



 
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Reyth

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Re: Single Dozen Progression
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2016, 11:59:28 AM »
I have heard there is a way to double your unit size and thus be able to further divide the amount bet so that it will always pay 1 unit instead of sometimes 2 units.
 
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Bayes

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Re: Single Dozen Progression
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2016, 12:33:46 PM »
You could use Louis G. Holloway's progression. If using the "rise and fall" scheme then go back 2 steps (because dozens are 2:1 odds) after each winner if not in profit, and return to step 1 on a new high. A more aggressive approach is to just keep going up after a loss or win until in profit.

1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
16
18
20
22
25
28
30
32
35
40
45
50
55
60
70
80
90
100
 
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Reyth

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Re: Single Dozen Progression
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2016, 12:38:06 AM »
1 1 1 1 1
2 2 2 2 3
3 3 4 4 5
5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 14 16
18 20 22 25 28
30 32 35 40 45
50 55 60 70 80
90 100

Very interesting.  42 elements where the practically expected limit has been shown to be 41...

I have come to loathe the "successive regression" phenomenon that destroys progressions like this.  What I have discovered recently is that the Labby can be used as a "the buck stops here" method of dealing with losses.  This is of course a very old and established concept but it is interesting to see it practically applied; it provides a further framework that can be examined for patterns and other vulnerabilities...

Someone posted about using the Johnson Progression on more than a EC:

Single Dozen Johnson Progression

Johnson Progression

Here also is the internationally famous, Jesper:

The Deep Sleep
« Last Edit: October 07, 2016, 04:11:23 PM by Reyth »