Author Topic: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method  (Read 1856 times)

kav

  • www.Roulette30.com
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1531
  • Thanked: 581 times
  • Gender: Male
Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« on: July 01, 2016, 12:56:05 PM »
This is one of the best methods to decide your up as you lose staking plan on the fly.
It is softer than the Laboucher and in some way similar to the Johnson system described in these topics:
Beating roulette with math...
Johnson progression
Credit goes to Lanky who made it public on roulette forums
-------

The Six Point Plan has been around for a long time.

 Few people use it.

And yet it is one of the easiest methods around to enable you to win on a consistent basis.
There really is no great risk attached to its operation, because you can introduce a built-in safety brake if things threaten to get out of control.Professionals regard it as the soundest of all target-staking methods.

 It’s been played in Australia for more than 50 years, but seems to have been more popular in the 30s and 40s than nowadays, when punters seem more impatient than their predecessors.

The aim of the Six Point Plan is to win six betting units every time the punter backs a winner, or winners, whose odds total six.

 The target figure decides the opening bet.

 Example: If you were aiming to win $6 altogether, the opening bet would be $1 because the DIVISOR is six. So you have six divided into six, which equals a bet of one unit.

The betting action is just a matter of simple division of the DIVISOR into the TARGET figure.

To explain the action, we’ll work to a target figure of $12. To work out your bets you use the divisor of six and the target of 12.

The opening bet, then, is $2 (12 divided by six). If the opening bet lost, the objective would be increased by the lost $2 to $14 and you would then divide six into 14 to get the total of the next bet.Rounding off, your next bet would be $2.50.

Let’s assume your bet lost again. You now have a target of $16.50 and this is divided by six so your next bet would be, rounded off, $3.

Let’s assume the worst and we have this bet losing. Your target now rises to $19.50, which again is divided by six to get your next bet, which is, rounded off, $3.50.

Good news! You get a winner at 2/1. That means you have won $7 of the target of $19.50, which reduces the target to $12.50.

You now have to drop your divisor by two points (the price of the winner) and this now becomes a divisor of four.

Your next bet, then, is $12.50 divided by four, which gives you a vet, rounded off, of $3. If this bet won, say, at 2/1 you would have a profit of $6 coming off the $12.50, leaving you only $6.50 to get to complete the Six Point Plan, with a divisor of 1. At this point you can simply rule off that particular section and begin a completely new Six Point target and divisor.

Should you strike a losing run which seems without end, you can easily halt any rapid rise in stakes by introducing the Safety Brake.

 The divisor may be six when you strike a slump which has taken the target figure to, say, 60, meaning a bet of 10 units next time.

All you do now is bring in a new divisor to add to the present one, and a fresh target. This means a new target of 12 (added to the current 60) making 72, and a new divisor of 12.

Your next bet, then, would be 72 divided by 12, equalling six.

If you were still not happy you could even bring in a third divisor of six and a third extra target of 12, making your set-up now a target of 84 divided by 18, meaning a next bet of, say, $4.50.You can also introduce new divisor/target figures when your current divisor has, say, dropped to two, with an objective, say, of $5. This calls for a $2.50 bet. Whenever the divisor is lower than three it is sensible, to protect your capital, to bring in a new divisor and objective, as this prevents stakes rising too rapidly in the event of a long losing run.

Divisor Target
2      5
Bring in new divisor
6      12
New divisor/target
8       17

As you can see, you now have a new divisor of eight and a new target of 17, giving you a next bet of, say, $2.

Why do we bring in this safety brake? Because, with a divisor of only two you Bets could climb too steeply and the situation just might become fraught with panic on your side.

The good thing about the Six Point Plan is that it provides, through the safety brakes, for a common-sense approach.

Also, you MUST win in the end! On any reasonable set of selections, you will eventually back winners whose combined total odds will wipe out the divisor and produce the desired profit.

It can be used for Evens=Red black etc
Dozens
Columns
Lines
Streets

« Last Edit: July 01, 2016, 12:59:27 PM by kav »


 
The following users thanked this post: Sputnik, december, Reyth, Sheridan44

Reyth

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3013
  • Thanked: 798 times
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2016, 01:41:09 PM »
Wow.  Playing this say, on underperforming double streets, would seem quite a powerful method...
 
The following users thanked this post: Sheridan44

Dane

  • Mature Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 260
  • Thanked: 109 times
  • Gender: Male
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2016, 12:55:28 PM »
What's the point? Oh yes, I see: Six point.
As Larry pointed out as a guest on another forum, he had also tried 4, 12, 18 point.
And he is always rounding up, not down, it seems.

So far I have seen no examples on double streets.
 
The following users thanked this post: Reyth

Reyth

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3013
  • Thanked: 798 times
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2016, 03:31:28 PM »
I tried it on a double street and it worked very well because its 5-1 instead of 1-1 for an EC.  That's not to say I have done extensive testing but that I was successful over a small amount of trials.
 

dobbelsteen

  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1203
  • Thanked: 260 times
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2016, 12:21:43 PM »
The goal is to win 6 units and the example bets are $$. On the table we have no $$ only units or fiches. There are no 0,5 units.Why  not an example using units then the method can be used universal.
Reyth you write ,you have tried the method. Why not a real report?

Who can write an Excel program?
 
 

Reyth

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3013
  • Thanked: 798 times
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2016, 01:59:55 PM »
Right.  I haven't been doing much programming lately.  Sorry. :(
 

dobbelsteen

  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1203
  • Thanked: 260 times
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2016, 08:57:28 AM »
On a real table there is no time to compute  the new bet after every spin. In my opinion this method is too complex. Where is the strategy?
 

Bayes

  • Veteran Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 577
  • Thanked: 434 times
  • roulettician.com
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2016, 09:35:23 AM »
 
The following users thanked this post: kav, december, Reyth

kav

  • www.Roulette30.com
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1531
  • Thanked: 581 times
  • Gender: Male
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2016, 10:27:03 AM »
In the age of information it is sometimes most important and harder to find the valuable info that is worth your time than find quantity of info. In my humble opinion, the divisor concept as well as the topics I mentioned in my first posts are worth your time and focus. They have helped me in my understanding of roulette systems when I read them for the first time in the past.

There are thousands (millions?) of topics in roulette forums all over the web.  I believe it is extremely important if to be able to focus on the "good stuff" - which is really subjective.

I plan to make a best posts topic. Maybe start a new topic where each member can link to the topics or posts on this forum that he finds more useful/important/enlightening.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2016, 10:46:27 AM by kav »
 
The following users thanked this post: december, Reyth

Reyth

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3013
  • Thanked: 798 times
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #9 on: July 05, 2016, 03:16:44 PM »
There are some people that have posted systems that are "on the leading edge" such as:

Pales, Harry J, Scepticus, Dobble, Random, Blue, Gno, Sputnik, yourself and I am sure others that I have forgotten to mention.

I think we can quantify and classify their methods and possibly we may learn to combine them in a concrete way to create a more powerful synthesis.  Other forums have done this and created a "forum based system".
« Last Edit: July 05, 2016, 03:19:53 PM by Reyth »
 

kav

  • www.Roulette30.com
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1531
  • Thanked: 581 times
  • Gender: Male
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2016, 03:44:41 PM »
There are some people that have posted systems that are "on the leading edge" such as:

Pales, Harry J, Scepticus, Dobble, Random, Blue, Gno, Sputnik, yourself and I am sure others that I have forgotten to mention.

I think we can quantify and classify their methods and possibly we may learn to combine them in a concrete way to create a more powerful synthesis.  Other forums have done this and created a "forum based system".
This would be really interesting.
Someone has to make the first step I guess...
 

Reyth

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3013
  • Thanked: 798 times
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #11 on: July 05, 2016, 04:43:45 PM »
Its kind of like a "zoology" of roulette systems, like an encyclopedia...
 

palestis

  • Veteran Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 550
  • Thanked: 279 times
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #12 on: July 05, 2016, 05:24:55 PM »
There are some people that have posted systems that are "on the leading edge" such as:

Pales, Harry J, Scepticus, Dobble, Random, Blue, Gno, Sputnik, yourself and I am sure others that I have forgotten to mention.

I think we can quantify and classify their methods and possibly we may learn to combine them in a concrete way to create a more powerful synthesis.  Other forums have done this and created a "forum based system".
What I see as the biggest mistake in roulette play, is multi-step progressions, limited only by the player's available B/R. There will be a time when a perpetual  increase as you lose type progression will fail, taking substantial profits previously made down the drain. And the road to recovery is a long and painful process, hoping that it won't happen again before you recover.
Every system has a range within which most of the expected wins happen. It could be bet 1-5 for some systems, or bet 2-4 in others etc.  The statistical frequency of wins within the range is determined by  research. Not guessing or hoping.
If for example you find that for a certain system 95% of the wins occur between steps 3 and 6, there is no need to start betting form spin-1, or extend the progression beyond step 6. You save your chips, so you can use them again when that 95% will be back on your side.
A second concept has to do with how  you confront roulette. One way of looking at it, is that it's a personal win/lose process. Not necessarily the process of trying to guess  what the roulette will spin.
 Ideally we should bet high when we win and bet low when we are about to lose.
Knowing this in advance is impossible.
However for the opposite we have a way of knowing.
We can eliminate lost bets, virtually or through vey low betting. What remains, it will be more expected wins than losses.
Since you can't lose or win every bet, if you eliminate the lost spins in advance, what you are left with is more statistical chances of winning than losing. Because you have eliminated several losses already thru the virtual process. 
For example if in 10 spins 6 will statistically be lost and 4 won, if you lose 5 of them virtually, you are left with 5 spins which should have a much higher win to lose ratio. Looking at it as your own personal luck. Not as a probability of what roulette is going to spin up.
It is a personal probability against yourself.

« Last Edit: July 05, 2016, 05:38:24 PM by palestis »
 
The following users thanked this post: december, random, Reyth, juice, ianpbh

Reyth

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3013
  • Thanked: 798 times
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #13 on: November 04, 2016, 05:29:08 AM »
I enjoyed using this again.  I set what I considered an extreme goal of a 21.5% gain in bankroll (100 units) and set off betting 2 dozens, the same 2 dozens perpetually.  I got a very strong run where my bets were in to the low single digits and then the wheel started to take back and so I decided to cut it off at about 1/3rd to the goal.

Interesting concept of setting a very high goal with a strong bet selection and then choosing when to take profits based on the flow.
 

Reyth

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3013
  • Thanked: 798 times
Re: Calculate your bets with the Six Point Divisor method
« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2016, 06:14:32 PM »
Hey question on this one.  I want to make sure I am doing this right and that my approach is equivalent to the proper method.  I leave the divisor at 6 but lower my target instead. 

So let's say the following:

I have a bank of 1000 units, 15 units is my minimum bet and I bet 15 units on even stakes and lose. 

My bank is now 985 units and my goal is to reach par which is 1000 units and represents a debt of 15 units divided by 6 is 2.5 which is rounded up to 3 and so now I bet 18 units.

I lose again and my balance is now 967 units which means I must bet 33 (debt) / 6 = 5.50 rounding up to 6 and so 21 units. 

I win and therefore my balance is 988 units and I must bet 12 (debt)/6= 2  and so 17 units.

This seems to work well for me where chop yields a profit with each round turn.  Am I doing this correctly?  Am I missing something about changing the divisor or is it ok that I change the target instead?

TIA! :D

Btw, on researching the first site that Bayes linked, the Safety Brake was recommended at 6 losses in a row until a winner is backed.  I think this is a very convenient method of determining when to apply the brake.  However, it has a vulnerability in that succesive draw downs of multiple losses with single wins can drive things out of control. 

Therefore, I have devised the following table:

Apply the Safety Brake when there are:

0 wins in the last 6 bets
1 wins in the last 8 bets
2 wins in the last 10 bets
3 wins in the last 12 bets
4 wins in the last 14 bets
5 wins in the last 16 bets
6 wins in the last 18 bets
7 wins in the last 20 bets
8 wins in the last 22 bets
9 wins in the last 24 bets
10 wins in the last 26 bets
... and so on...

I am not that talented when it comes to setting up betting systems but this seems to make sense where each win is considered to be worth 2 losses which then leaves 6 cumulative unanswered losses.

The site also recommends that once the divisor is increased beyond 6, it will be increased by 1 with every loss until a winner is finally backed.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2016, 01:18:31 PM by Reyth »
 
The following users thanked this post: kav, juice